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Nutrient solutions Recipe for General Vegetative, Flowering & Fruiting
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Srikanth
Serilingampally, Hyderabad
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November 5, 2010 - 9:55 am
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Hello All,

 

Wish you all a happy Deepavali.

 

Please find below a basic recipe for preparation of Hydropnics Nutrient Solutions for various stages of plant growth (Vegetative, Flowering & Fruiting). This is a general purpose recipe.

To Make

100 Liters of Nutrient Solution

Salt Weight in Grams
 

Vegetative Nutrient (9.5 : 5.7 : 11.3)

Weight in Grams
 

Flowering Nutrient (5.5 :  8 : 18.4)

Weight in Grams
 

Fruiting Nutrient (8.2 : 5.9 : 13.6)

Soln A/B
Calcium Nitrate – Ca(No3)2 158.73 108.47 211.64 A
Potassium Nitrate – KNO3 55.29 74.07 74.07 A
Sulphate of Potash – K2SO4 12.17 12.17 44.97 B
Monopatassium Phosphate – KH2PO4 36.77 36.77 36.77 B
Magnesium Sulphate – MgSO4 * 7H2O 64.02 63.49 63.49 B
Trace Mix  10 ml 10 ml 10 ml B
Chelated Iron 100 ml 100 ml 100 ml A
Trace Mix for 1 L Concentrated

Solution

Weight in Grams
Zinc Sulphate (ZnSO4) 2.20
Manganese Sulphate (MnSO4) 15.4
Copper Sulphate (CuSO4) 0.8
Boric Acid (H3BO3) 28.60
Sodium Molybdate (Na2MoO4) 0.25
Iron Concentrate Solution for

1 L

Weight in Grams
Chelated Iron (FeEDTA) 19.48

 

How to Prepare the solution.

Iron Chelate Solution – Take 1 Litre bottle and add the Chelated Iron to 500 ml of water and dissolve it. Once dissolved top up the bottle to 1 L capacity

Trace Mix Solution – Take 1 Litre bottle and fill it with 500 ml of water. Add each of the trace element salts individually and dissolve one by one. Ensure that you add the next salt only after the previous salt it completely dissolved. After all trace elements are dissolved top up the bottle with water to 1 L capacity

 

Take two 5L cans and label them as Solution A and Solution B.

 

Solution A

1) Take a 5 L can and label it as Solution A

2) Fill about 4 liters of water in the can

3) Add Calcium Nitrate and dissolve it completely

4) Add Potassium Nitrate dissolve it completely

5) Add 100 ml of the Iron Chelate solution

6) Top up the can with water to make it 5 L in capacity

 

Solution B

1) Take a 5 L can and label it as Solution B

2) Fill about 4 liters of water in the can

3) Add each of the salts and dissolve in the can one by one. Ensure that the next salt is added only after the previous salt is completely dissolved.

4) Add 10 ml of the trace mix

5) Top up the can with water to it 5 L in capacity

 

Now you have two 5 L cans of Solution A and Solution B. This is good for making 100 L of the Nutrient Solution. In case you need to make 10 L of the solution fill the reservoir tank with 5 L of water and then add 500 ml of Solution A and mix it thoroughly. Next add 500 ml of Solution B and mix it thorughly. Now fill up the reservoir to the 10 L capacity.

 

A note about Water Quality and pH.

Water Quality – It is very important that the quality of water is good. Softened bore water is a big no no for Hydroponics due to the addition of NaCl during the ion exchange process. Ideally you should be using RO water or Rain water. In case you have to use municipal water let it sit for a day to get rid of the chlorine but I doubt how good the water our municipalities supply. In a later post I will give more information on creating your own recipes based on PPM and taking water quality into consideration.

pH – It is important to maintain the correct pH. You would need a pH meter to check for pH. So far I never had a need to decrease the pH (acidify) of the solution when using RO water. You can use Cooking Soda for increasing the pH while vinegar or citric acid or diluted Sulphuric acid (battery acid) for decreasing the pH.

 

Disclaimer/Credits: The NKP part of the receipe has been adopted mainly from Keith Roberto's wonderful book - 'How to Hydroponics'. The Trace elements part is gathered / culled from the many good people at the hyrdo forum on GardenWeb and the sample recipe by Daniel Fernandez's Hydroponic Buddy Calculator. If this is in violation of any copyrights please feel free to report this post to the admin to have this post deleted.

 

I hope this is useful.

 

Thanks,

Srikanth

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geekgardener
Bangalore, India
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November 5, 2010 - 3:09 pm
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Thanks a lot Srikanth for the very informative post.

I am sure this will serve as a reference for most of them who are on the lookout for nutrients recipes. Calculation for Compensating for the nutrients already present in water will also be a very good addition to this.

 

I will try to see if I can make this post sticky.

 

GG

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Deepak
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November 7, 2010 - 10:11 pm

Hi Srikanth,

 

Are you using the same formula that is suggested for all the plants..

 

If I break the above formula to get the

N P K Ca Mg S Fe B Mn Zn Cu Mo

part on PPM basis then I found it very strong then usual formulas available.

 

Please find the formula breakdown.

Vegetative

N P K Ca Mg S Fe B Mn Zn Cu Mo
 325 85  375  295  65  100   2.5  .44 .62   .09  .05  .03  

 

Flowering

 

N P K Ca Mg S Fe B Mn Zn Cu Mo
 270 80 440 200  63  100   2.5  .44  .62  .09 .05  .03   

 

Fruiting

 

P K Ca Mg S Fe B Mn Zn Cu Mo
425 80 590 380 63 170 2.4 .44 .62 .09 .05 .03  

 

If you are using the same formula and had got good results then it is great, as it gives perfect composition for different stage of growth.

 

I have got a caculator which has different compositon for different stage for different plants.

 

I will try and uplodad that.

 

Thanks & Regards,

 

Deepak

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geekgardener
Bangalore, India
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November 8, 2010 - 12:04 am
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Deepak,

I didn't do a break down analysis of the above Keith Roberto's formula. But, with the figures you have posted, it does appear to be on the higher concentration. Especially P is quite higher than most of the nutrients I came across. May be it is for a commercial production that needs a high EC. One thing is it gobbles up lots of salts and it might burn a hole in our pockets.

 

Do upload the calculator you mentioned. 

Thanks for the info

gg

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Srikanth
Serilingampally, Hyderabad
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November 8, 2010 - 7:01 am
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Hi Deepak,

 

I am not sure how your calculator works, but based on couple of calculators that I have your numbers are off especially for Nitrogen (I only checked for the Vegetative formula). It is important that you use the correct salt and grade (Fertilizer grade vs Chemical grade).

 

As an example:

100 gr of Calcium Nitrate (Ca(No3)2) has 153 ppm of N and 219 ppm of Ca while 100 gr of Fertilizer Grade Calcium Nitrate (5Ca(NO3)2NH4NO3.10H2O) has 118 ppm of N and 85 ppm of Ca both at 90% purity.

 

I just did not want to complicate the formula as it is for the novices.

 

No, I did not use these formulations. I have been using different formulations for different Vegetables.

 

Here's a very good source of a NS Calculator: http://scienceinhydroponics.co.....ram-o.html

 

Thanks,

Srikanth

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Deepak
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November 8, 2010 - 1:24 pm

Hi Srikant,

 

Thank you very much for this valuable information.

 

I have uploaded the calculator that I was using and in the calculator there is a option to break different checmicals on different PPM parts and grades as shown in a example by you.

 

You are correct that may be that will be the reason why PPM parts were very high.

 

Earlier I have ordered chemicals from a different vendor in mumbai and I think he supplied me different grade then what is required and may be therefore I was having issues where flowers were falling off..

 

This time however for my other place I have ordered chemcials from Mysore fertilizer in bangalore and I hope he must have provided me correct chemicals which were required.

 

I have even downloaded the new calculator suggested by you and checking more how it is working

 

Thanks again. Keep posting

 

Deepak

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geekgardener
Bangalore, India
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November 8, 2010 - 3:25 pm
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Srikanth said:

 

As an example:

100 gr of Calcium Nitrate (Ca(No3)2) has 153 ppm of N and 219 ppm of Ca while 100 gr of Fertilizer Grade Calcium Nitrate (5Ca(NO3)2NH4NO3.10H2O) has 118 ppm of N and 85 ppm of Ca both at 90% purity.

 

 

Thanks,

Srikanth


Srikanth,

 

I agree with your point on the grade of chemical used.

The formula you have mentioned for Fertilizer grade calcium nitrate is actually calcium ammonium nitrate which is altogether a different salt with 27%N (both Nitrate nitrogen and ammoniacal nitrogen).

Ignore this if thats a typo.

 

Thanks

GG

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Srikanth
Serilingampally, Hyderabad
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November 8, 2010 - 4:23 pm
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Hi GG,

 

The point I am trying to make is that it is very easy to get misled with the naming of the fertilizers. What we generally call as Magnesium Sulphate (MgSo4) is often Magnesium Sulphate Heptahydrate (MgSo4 . 7H20).

 

Thanks,

Srikanth

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Gardenia
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November 8, 2010 - 8:08 pm

Hi,

Let me know some source for buying these salts. Also if some one can put approximate cost of each salt, will help.

 

Gardenia

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Deepak
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November 8, 2010 - 10:49 pm

Hi Srikanth,

It seems you got good knowledge about all these chemicals.

Are you into this field or have you got some good source for this information.

Regards,

Deepak

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Srikanth
Serilingampally, Hyderabad
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November 8, 2010 - 11:05 pm
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Hi Deepak,

 

I am just a hobbyist. I spent over a year reading anything I could lay my eyes on related to Hydroponics right from Keith Roberto to just about anything with a mention of Hydroponics. I have been lurking on many Hydroponic forums and learnt a few things from many Hydro gurus.

 

I have burnt my fingers quite a few times hence I know what mistake novices make. The first time, I mixed all dry salts! Imagine mixing Calcium Nitrate and Magnesium Sulphate as dry salts. I was that naive to start with. I am sure there is long road ahead to travel but then I hope there will be the occassion guide to help me when I go astray.

 

There are many ebooks on the subject. P2P is your friend.

 

thanks,

Srikanth

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Deepak
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November 9, 2010 - 9:23 am

Hi Srikanth,

 

thanks for the info.

 

The chemicals that your are using at this point of time for hydroponics are ordered from hyderabad or from some other location ?

 

Regards,

 

Deepak

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Srikanth
Serilingampally, Hyderabad
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November 9, 2010 - 10:10 am
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Hi Deepak,

Most of the chemicals are regular water soluble fertilizer (make sure they are compatible with drip irrigation). Calcium Nitrate and Potassium nitrate are either from Israel or Belgium repackaged by indian companies. Magesium Sulphate, Potassium Sulphate and Mono Potassium Phosphate (MKP) are made by indian companies. The quality of these are questionable. I would generally put their purity at 80%. All these and the trace minerals are available at regular fertilizer stores in the cities except for Ammonium Molybdate.

 

Not many stores stock Molybdenum salts as it is very expensive and used in small quantities. I bought it from a chemical store, the kind that stocks lab equipments and salts for schools and colleges.

 

TIP: How to measure purity of salts - Take 10 grams of a salt and dissolve it completly in 1 L water at 25 degree Centigrade. Measure the PPM and compare with any of the calculators (that have already been posted on this forum) or if you are good at Molar weights (then you wouldn't need this tip, I guess) calculate it yourself.

 

Thanks,

Srikanth

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geekgardener
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November 9, 2010 - 10:37 am
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Just to add to that tip. Ensure the water you take for dissolving is distilled water/RO or measure the water's PPM first so that you don't end up with higher PPM numbers.

 

-GG

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Deepak
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November 9, 2010 - 1:55 pm

Hi GG/Srikanth,

Good information.

Would like to know what is the impact of the impurity and what steps can we take after knowing the impurity level to correct the formula ??

Thanks & Regards,

Deepak

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geekgardener
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November 9, 2010 - 3:03 pm
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Deepak,

 

Impurity directly affects your target PPM. Based on the % of impurity, there will be a reduction of a particular element in the nutrient.

 

Lets say  100g a salt (100% pure) contains about 50% calcium in it. If it was only 90% pure, then the active salt is only 90grams and rest is impurity. That way instead of getting 50g of calcium you now get only 45gm of calcium. To compensate the loss due to impurity you need to add more of that original salt.

 

Usually purity levels of 95-98 is acceptable. 100% reagent grade will cost a fortune. 500gm of calcium nitrate will cost you about close to INR 300.

You get the idea.

GG

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Urban Gardener
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November 9, 2010 - 10:50 pm
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Hi GG & Srikanth,

Thanks for the details. This sure is an informative post.

 

Nice work . Shows the efforts put in Hydroponics by you guys.

 

Are there any specific brands of Chemicals which we can trust for the quality and use in hydroponics ?

 

Happy Growing !

UG

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hydroguru
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April 27, 2011 - 6:02 pm

What should the Ph level be in the solutions below...

ALSO: What is the EC of the below formula... Many thanks.

 

Srikanth said:

Hello All,

 

Wish you all a happy Deepavali.

 

Please find below a basic recipe for preparation of Hydropnics Nutrient Solutions for various stages of plant growth (Vegetative, Flowering & Fruiting). This is a general purpose recipe.

To Make
 


100 Liters of Nutrient Solution
Salt Weight in Grams

 

Vegetative Nutrient (9.5 : 5.7 : 11.3)


 

 


 
Weight in Grams

 

Flowering Nutrient (5.5 :  8 : 18.4)


 

 


 
Weight in Grams

 

Fruiting Nutrient (8.2 : 5.9 : 13.6)


 

 


 
Soln A/B
Calcium Nitrate – Ca(No3)2 158.73 108.47 211.64 A
Potassium Nitrate – KNO3 55.29 74.07 74.07 A
Sulphate of Potash – K2SO4 12.17 12.17 44.97 B
Monopatassium Phosphate – KH2PO4 36.77 36.77 36.77 B
Magnesium Sulphate – MgSO4 * 7H2O 64.02 63.49 63.49 B
Trace Mix  10 ml 10 ml 10 ml B
Chelated Iron 100 ml 100 ml 100 ml A
Trace Mix for 1 L Concentrated
 

Solution

Weight in Grams
Zinc Sulphate (ZnSO4) 2.20
Manganese Sulphate (MnSO4) 15.4
Copper Sulphate (CuSO4) 0.8
Boric Acid (H3BO3) 28.60
Sodium Molybdate (Na2MoO4) 0.25
Iron Concentrate Solution for
 

1 L

Weight in Grams
Chelated Iron (FeEDTA) 19.48

 

How to Prepare the solution.

Iron Chelate Solution – Take 1 Litre bottle and add the Chelated Iron to 500 ml of water and dissolve it. Once dissolved top up the bottle to 1 L capacity

Trace Mix Solution – Take 1 Litre bottle and fill it with 500 ml of water. Add each of the trace element salts individually and dissolve one by one. Ensure that you add the next salt only after the previous salt it completely dissolved. After all trace elements are dissolved top up the bottle with water to 1 L capacity

 

Take two 5L cans and label them as Solution A and Solution B.

 

Solution A

1) Take a 5 L can and label it as Solution A

2) Fill about 4 liters of water in the can

3) Add Calcium Nitrate and dissolve it completely

4) Add Potassium Nitrate dissolve it completely

5) Add 100 ml of the Iron Chelate solution

6) Top up the can with water to make it 5 L in capacity

 

Solution B

1) Take a 5 L can and label it as Solution B

2) Fill about 4 liters of water in the can

3) Add each of the salts and dissolve in the can one by one. Ensure that the next salt is added only after the previous salt is completely dissolved.

4) Add 10 ml of the trace mix

5) Top up the can with water to it 5 L in capacity

 

Now you have two 5 L cans of Solution A and Solution B. This is good for making 100 L of the Nutrient Solution. In case you need to make 10 L of the solution fill the reservoir tank with 5 L of water and then add 500 ml of Solution A and mix it thoroughly. Next add 500 ml of Solution B and mix it thorughly. Now fill up the reservoir to the 10 L capacity.

 

A note about Water Quality and pH.

Water Quality – It is very important that the quality of water is good. Softened bore water is a big no no for Hydroponics due to the addition of NaCl during the ion exchange process. Ideally you should be using RO water or Rain water. In case you have to use municipal water let it sit for a day to get rid of the chlorine but I doubt how good the water our municipalities supply. In a later post I will give more information on creating your own recipes based on PPM and taking water quality into consideration.

pH – It is important to maintain the correct pH. You would need a pH meter to check for pH. So far I never had a need to decrease the pH (acidify) of the solution when using RO water. You can use Cooking Soda for increasing the pH while vinegar or citric acid or diluted Sulphuric acid (battery acid) for decreasing the pH.

 

Disclaimer/Credits: The NKP part of the receipe has been adopted mainly from Keith Roberto's wonderful book - 'How to Hydroponics'. The Trace elements part is gathered / culled from the many good people at the hyrdo forum on GardenWeb and the sample recipe by Daniel Fernandez's Hydroponic Buddy Calculator. If this is in violation of any copyrights please feel free to report this post to the admin to have this post deleted.

 

I hope this is useful.

 

Thanks,

Srikanth


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praveen maranat
kerala, india
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September 27, 2011 - 12:30 pm
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Hi Srikanth,

I am a hobbyist hydroponic gardner. I have been growing vegetables using the nutrients i bought. I have Grow / bloom / root / CaNo3 / MgSo4.

The recommended dosage was for 30 Ltrs 1 Teespoon of Grow, >1.1/4 teespoon of CaNo3 and <3/4 of MgSo4.

The plants do grow, but compared to the plants grown on the soil , their growth is not good enough. I believe the  nutrient solution is not strong enough. The PH of the solution was 5.7 and the ppm was 520ppm because the well water which i am using has a ppm of only 82 ppm.

Please advise the correct ratio to mix the nutrients to get the desirable ppm as i have read that the ppm for tomatoes must be in the range of 1600- 2400 ppm.

Also teh formula which you have posted,. will it be the same for all waters because the ppm would differ.

Please advice

Brgds

Praveen , Kerala

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Srikanth
Serilingampally, Hyderabad
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September 27, 2011 - 2:03 pm
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Hi Praveen,

 

I cannot really answer your question w.r.t ppm for tomato. Generally it varies b/w 800 to 3500 depending on who you are talking to. My formula gives me around 1400 if I remember correctly. I use this formula for so many plants for so long now that I have stopped measuring the final PPM. I know it just works so I do not bother checking the PPM.

 

I am not sure what the grow, bloom and root formula are? What brand are they and where did you buy them?

Regarding the ppm: If your water ppm is 82 then you need to add that to your final ppm. So if you need 1600 ppm then you should target 1682. Ideally you should get your water analyzed and then adjust the input salts for it. As your water ppm is only 82 you can ignore it safely.

BTW, I haven't heard of well water in such a long time. I haven't seen a well in Hyderabad for over 30 years now.

Let me know if you need more information.

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