Sowing Chart | Seed Starting | Urban Gardening, Terrace gardening and Hydroponics

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Sowing Chart
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geekgardener
Bangalore, India
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March 14, 2011 - 12:16 am
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Sowing Seasons

Month North India South India
JANUARY Brinjal Lettuce,Spinach, Gourds, Melons, Radish, Carrot, Onion, Tomato,Okra,Brinjal, Bean
FEBRUARY Applegourd, Bittergourd, Bottle gourd, Cucumber, French Beans, Okra, Sponge, Gourd, Watermelon, Spinach Same as January
MARCH Same as February Amaranthus, Coriander, Gourds, Beans, Melons, Spinach, Okra
APRIL Capsicum Onion, Amaranthus, Coriander, Gourds, Okra, Tomato, Chilli
MAY Onion, Pepper, Brinjal Okra, Onion, Chilli
JUNE All gourds, Brinjal, Cucumber, Cauliflower (Early), Okra, Onion,Sem,Tomato,Pepper Gourds, Solanaeceae,Almost all vegetables
JULY All gourds, Cucumber, Okra, Sem, Tomato Same as June
AUGUST Carrot, Cauliflower, Radish, Tomato Carrot, Cauliflower, Beans, Beet
SEPTEMBER Cabbage, Carrot, Cauliflower, Peas, Radish, Tomato, Lettuce Cauliflower, Cucumber, Onion,Peas,Spinach
OCTOBER Beet, Brinjal, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Lettuce, Peas, Radish, Spinach, Turnip Brinjal, Cabbage,Capsicum,Cucumber, Beans,Peas, Spinach, Turnip, Watermelon
NOVEMBER Turnip, Tomato, Radish, Pepper, Peas, Beet Beet, Eggplant, Cabbage, Carrot, Beans, Lettuce, Melon, Okra, Turnip
DECEMBER Tomato Lettuce, Pumpkin,…
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Muru
Chennai
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March 14, 2011 - 12:06 pm
Member Since: December 27, 2010
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Hi GG,

Thankyou so much for the pocket handout which for sure will find its place to both novice and experienced gardeners. Also thanking the team which made it happen.

As you rightly pointed out this sheet will minimize the gardeners mistake of sowing things in non-seasonal timings.

Also it would be great if the team can come up with a similar chart for common pests/insects attacks and the recommended remedies to handle it. This is the second biggest hurdle we gardeners face.

 Regards,

-Muru-

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enthumaali
Pune
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March 14, 2011 - 1:01 pm
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HI GG

Thank to you and your team for giving the sowing chart.  It will really come in handy for beginners with veggies like me.

Please tell me, is it OK to plant okra or other veggies in large thick plastic bags (the ones you get your stuff from malls) ? it will help to reduce the weight on a balcony. Drainage holes can be made accordingly.

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Satish
New Delhi
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March 15, 2011 - 11:40 am
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Hi Enthumaali:

While your query is addressed to GG, I am taking the liberty to 'intervene' & hope it is OK with both of you. I have been growing different vegetables and ornamental flowers on the terrace in plastic sacks that are the 'leaking' kind because drainage is no problem there. I am satisfied with the results. However, as it gets really hot in Delhi in the summer, the 'leaky' sacks are likely to lose too much water. I am therefore in the process of trying out the non-woven plastic bags of the kind you get with your shopping. I have also used some 10 kg bags of atta. I feel that these bags will not lose too much water by evaporation from the sides. However, for that reason the drainage has to be particularly good to avoid 'stagnancy' of water. This is what I am trying: First, I punched a few holes in the bottom of the bag. Then I layed a 1" to 2" layer of broken bricks as the bottom layer. Thereon I layed a very thick layer of dried leaves/grass clippings. Finally I put in my topping mixture. To take care of any fungal infection I drenched the whole thing with water containing a little Bavistin. So far all is well. I have not grown Okra in sacks but I see no problem therein. If I were you I would wait for GG's advice regarding this as I am as much of an amateur as you seem to be !!. Regards.

Satish

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geekgardener
Bangalore, India
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March 15, 2011 - 7:29 pm
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Hello Satish,

By all means, please intervene :). Your answer is spot on and I would like to add little more to it that is specific to enthumaali's question.

Hello Enthumaali,

Large bags are good for growing Okras. I am assuming, by bags, you mean the ones you get from clothing stores and such ? or groceries?. Anyways, if you use a bag that has wide opening at the top, then you have to fill the media properly so that they bag gets a shape. This is very important if you are planning to move the bag (with plant)now and then. You will observe the wide cracks in the top of the media as the media settles on the sides. You can also use nursery bags that have 12" dia and 15-18" depth. Another best option is to use 5/10kg rice sacks. These sacks, though they are made of woven plastic, they are lined with polythene on the inside and so they don't drain. You still need to make drainage holes.

For Okra, prefer a bag that has more depth. Okra grow's upto 8feet and needs lot of support and anchorage. If the polythene is too shallow, it will result in the plant falling quite often. I used 8ltr bucket and my job daily was to lift the fallen pots.

That said, do lots of experimenting with bags. You might get some new great ideas. Feel free to experiment and we are all here to learn 😀

I don't want to ruin the topic going here. But it is preferable to start a new thread on questions that is not related to the thread. What say?.

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Satish
New Delhi
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March 17, 2011 - 2:07 pm
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Hi GG:

Just to continue with what you have said (before you start a topic on growing vegies in sacks !) I would like to mention a few points:

1. Regarding the matter about giving a shape to the sacks: I rolled up the top edge of the sack like you roll up the sleeves of your shirt !

2. I have very successfully used the 5 & 10 Kg woven plastic bags in which we get vermicompost. These have no polythene lining and the woven nature takes care of the drainage.

3. These days a new kind of bio-degradable material is being used for packing grains. I have very satisfactorily used 25 Kg.  rice sacks of this material. These also do not need any holes for drainage as the material is porous.

https://picasaweb.google.com/108184095189913552151/BloomersInSacks?authkey=Gv1sRgCNarxL2JyoelBA&feat=directlink

I am having trouble pasting the link to my picasa album here but have still tried. If it works you will see all that I have said above properly demonstrated.

Are you shifting this discussion to a new topic? Please do. Thanks & regards

Satish

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Satish
New Delhi
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March 17, 2011 - 2:10 pm
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Hi GG:

Halleluja !! As you must have seen, I have finally succeeded in posting the pics. Please see an enlarged version of some and you will see how I rolled down the top edge of the sacks to give them a shape. Regards.

Satish

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jamey
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March 17, 2011 - 3:59 pm

One tip I saw in youtube demonstrated by a terrace gardener in Kerala is Cement bags. He folds in half and folds it inside for thickness and the bottom he tucks the corners inside. I will try to post the link to the video. It was on youtube and the video is in Malayalam.

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jamey
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March 17, 2011 - 4:05 pm

Ok, here you go...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v.....ure=fvwrel

 

from 2:27 onwards

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Satish
New Delhi
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March 17, 2011 - 7:29 pm
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Thanks Jamey ! I will just go and try to do this with a sack ! Have you noticed the other sack in the video? The top edge is rolled down like I also do it. Regards

Satish

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jamey
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March 19, 2011 - 9:58 am

Sorry guys the bags shown in the video are rice bags. Good quality plastic rice bags. But i've heard of people using cement bags as well.

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Darkstorm
Bombay
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May 20, 2011 - 4:42 am
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hi.

for bombay which has a more central position, which section should I follow in the chart ? north or south ?

 

many thanks for puttting this valuable info together.

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STS
Bangalore
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May 20, 2011 - 12:05 pm
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GG, 

 

This is great chart. I have a request, can you also consider putting together a fertilizer chart both organic and chemical(NPK's). What I mean here is, which fertilizer to use at what stage for a particular plant. 

 

Cheers... STS

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Darkstorm
Bombay
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May 20, 2011 - 12:38 pm
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stk wrote>>..

I have a request, can you also consider putting together a fertilizer chart both organic and chemical(NPK's).

that isn't a small task : )

It'd be nice if people added their input here about their experiences, with respect to the sowing chart,..relevant temperatures & other info -  that way it'd keep getting polished up

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Sangeetha Sriram
Chennai
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August 12, 2012 - 2:03 pm
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GG,

I have specific questions about the sowing chart. I am from Chennai.

1. I didn't know that gourds could be sown in March! Instead, I thought they could be sown in November!

2. I thought Spinach could be grown any part of the year. Or is it different for the creeper (perennial) and the non-creeper varieties?

3. Are sowing seasons different for hybrid and indigenous varieties of the same vegetable?

4. I thought okra and brinjal could be grown throughout the year.

It would be great if someone could answer these questions!

Thanks,

Sangeetha

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mungbean
New Delhi, India
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June 25, 2013 - 10:52 am
Member Since: February 14, 2011
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hello, anyone here?

 

I was wondering if there is a similar chart for flowers and annuals, in other words non-fruit/veg...?

I recently shifted from Bangalore to Delhi, and am still trying to work out when to sow and plant things.  It seemed like in Bangalore you could pretty much plant anything whenever you wanted, but here in Delhi the cold winter is going to make a big difference I think.

 

Thanks!

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